The National Review Online recently published an article on the realtionship between gun control and mass murders in Europe and America. It also explores the misperception that mass murder is an exclusively American phenomenon. As it turns Europe has us beat. And they have tons of gun control. The author is John Lott, well known author of More Guns, Less Crime There are some very interesting facts:

“all the multiple-victim public shootings in Western Europe have occurred in places where civilians are not permitted to carry guns. The same is true in the United States: All the public shootings in which more than three people have been killed have occurred in places where civilians may not legally bring guns. “

As evidence he includes a list of European mass killings:

  • Zug, Switzerland, Sept. 27, 2001: A man whose lawsuits had been denied murdered 14 members of a cantonal parliament.
  • Tours, France, Oct. 29, 2001: Four people were killed and ten wounded when a French railway worker started shooting at a busy intersection.
  • Nanterre, France, March 27, 2002: A man killed eight city-council members after a council meeting.
  • Erfurt, Germany, April 26, 2002: A former student killed 18 at a secondary school.
  • Freising, Germany, Feb. 19, 2002: Three people killed and one wounded.
  • Turin, Italy, Oct. 15, 2002: Seven people killed on a hillside overlooking the city.
  • Madrid, Spain, Oct. 1, 2006: A man killed two employees and wounded another at a company that had fired him.
  • Emsdetten, Germany, Nov. 20, 2006: A former student murdered eleven people at a high school.
  • Tuusula, Finland, Nov. 7, 2007: Seven students and the principal killed at a high school.
  • Naples, Italy, Sept. 18, 2008: Seven dead and two seriously wounded in a public meeting hall. (This incident is not included in the totals given below because it may have involved the Mafia.)
  • Kauhajoki, Finland, Sept. 23, 2008: Ten people shot to death at a college.
  • Winnenden, Germany, March 11, 2009: A 17-year-old former student killed 15 people, including nine students and three teachers.
  • Lyon, France, March 19, 2009: Ten people injured when a man opened fire on a nursery school.
  • Athens, Greece, April 10, 2009: Three people killed and two injured by a student at a vocational college.
  • Rotterdam, Netherlands, April 11, 2009: Three people killed and one injured at a crowded café.
  • Vienna, Austria, May 24, 2009: One dead and 15 wounded in an attack on a Sikh temple.
  • Espoo, Finland, Dec. 31, 2009: Four people shot to death at a mall.
  • Cumbria, England, June 2, 2010: Twelve killed by a British taxi driver.

Finally there is a break down of annual averages. In the U.S. the yearly average of people killed in mass killing is 10.6, whereas in Europe it is 12.5. And again there is this interesting little tid bit:

“all the multiple-victim public shootings in Western Europe have occurred in places where civilians are not permitted to carry guns. The same is true in the United States: All the public shootings in which more than three people have been killed have occurred in places where civilians may not legally bring guns. “

Clearly criminals and psychopaths prefer unarmed victems. I find it very interesting that people get up in arms (pardon the pun) over the killings listed above when governments kill far more people than any of the mass murderers in the previous examples.

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